Nail Professional Breathing Zone Protection – A Closer Look

Protection from respirable dust particles, which are invisible because of their very small size (less than 3 microns), should be the focal point of preventing nail dust inhalation exposure. These microscopic dust particles, which can stay suspended and float around in the salon air for up to 10 hours,  create the greatest health risk. Additionally, the larger chemical laden dust particles often end up on the manicure table top, where the NT’s forearms rest all day. Prolonged and repeated nail dust skin contact can cause contact dermatitis issues. Proper ventilation & good application technique will also lower incidence rates of contact dermatitis.

(This video illustrates how long microscopic dust remains in the room air)

(For effective source capture ventilation, a large filter with a sufficient amount of activated carbon is necessary)

 

When it comes to preventing inhalation exposure to chemical vapors, many so called Nail Source Capture Systems provide nail professionals with little if any breathing zone protection. The “old style” downdraft method allow chemical vapors to escape into the breathing zone, and migrate into the salon air. The most effective systems include a filter with a sufficient amount of activated carbon, (i.e. 2 lbs.), and utilize a positional extractor arm & capture hood. This method  allows the nail pro to manage where the hood is placed to control & minimize nail product inhalation exposure.

(Downdraft tables are not as effective as source capture points positioned over or adjacent to the work space.  They are also difficult and messy to clean)

 

(An example of a highly effective source capture system that removes nail dust and vapors with powerful suction, a high capacity dust filter and high grade activated carbon.  This model features eHEPA®  technology that also destroys microbial threats and has a built in LED light)

Some nail product vapors have little or no appreciable odor, but still can pose an inhalation exposure hazard.  Don’t ventilate to control odors; ventilate to control vapors and dusts. It’s especially important to control the air quality of your breathing zone.

Guidelines for Controlling and Minimizing Inhalation Exposure to Nail Products

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Zones of Contention

The recent Nails Magazine article, “Dust Up Over Nail Salon Air Quality”, mentions proposed bill, A.526 (see link below).

This bill does not include proper ventilation engineering controls to prevent inhalation exposure to nail product vapors, and also does not specifically address nail dust inhalation exposure, which may be cause for even greater concern. Use of safer products should be a component of a broader approach to preventing nail technician overexposure to nail products. Relying only on chemical product banning simply delays introducing proper breathing zone protection with highly effective source capture ventilation technology.

Making matters worse instead of better, chemical banning proposals are also a tool & smokescreen for fear based advocacy groups interested in raising money, but not in practical solutions such as proper employee training & proper ventilation.

Use of a nail professional source capture system, combined with proper use and maintenance, is the key component in protecting the nail tech and client’s breathing zone from inhalation exposure to both nail product vapors and dust.

Other Zones of Contention

 

…….Kim penned an editorial published Sept. 1, 2016 in the Queens Tribune that stated, “Being decisive and taking action is important, but we need an inclusive, collaborative approach to truly help these workers.” In the editorial, Kim’s proposed solution to salon air quality is A.526, which would ban the use of the “toxic trio” of chemicals (which the bill identifies as “toluene, dibutyl phthalates, and formaldehyde”) in nail polish and hardeners. He states this will “more equitably address the real root of the issue.” However, as addressed in other NAILS magazine articles, the notion of any nail product ingredients being “toxic” at the levels used is controversial in and of itself. The IMC does not provide any relief based on products or processes used, and Aerovex’s Cardarella notes, “It’s a misconception to tie odor level to the hazard level of the chemical. Odor is not an indicator of the hazard….[Banning specific chemicals in nail salons] is not an answer by itself. It’s a misconception to think this approach eliminates the need for proper and appropriate ventilation.”

To learn more about proposed NY State Assembly bill A.526 click here

Read Nails Magazine article “”Dust Up Over Nail Salon Air Quality

NY State to Implement Stringent Ventilation Requirements Oct. 3rd!

“Nail salons, new and existing, will be required to have ventilation that complies with the 2015 International Mechanical Code, a voluntary standard set by the International Code Council, an organization that devises minimum safety standards for workplaces and other spaces. There are approximately 5,000 salons in New York State. Salons that do not comply risk fines and possible loss of their license.”

Read the full article from The New York Times

 

Healthy Air® Nail Salon Source Capture Systems meet 2009, 2012 and 2015 IMC Code For Nail Salons

Meet IMC Source Capture Ventilation Code for Your Nail Salon!

Need to meet ventilation code for your nail salon?  Healthy Air® Nail Salon Source Capture systems have you covered!

For new nail salons, IMC code requires a source capture system capable of exhausting a minimum of 50 CFM per station with exhaust inlets located not more than 12 inches from the point of chemical application.

By capturing contaminants at the source with an adjustable flexible air intake, the Healthy Air® Nail Salon Source Capture system meets or exceeds the IMC requirement for source capture ventilation in the nail salon.

Also, the Healthy Air nail salon source capture systems can be attached to duct transition, directing the treated air out of the salon. 

By treating this outgoing air, Healthy Air source capture systems prevent nail dust from accumulating in ductwork that could result in fire hazards and stop contaminated air from re-entering the salon and/or causing problems with neighboring businesses.

 

how ha meets imc

Yet another advantage of Healthy Air source capture systems for nail salons is the ability apply the clean air output for each system to the overall 0.6 CFM/ft2 that is required to exhaust from the overall salon air, saving energy and money (IMC 2015 Table 403.3.1.1 for Nail Salons b,h)

Attention Contractors!  Questions about nail salon ventilation codes?

View summary of IMC 2009, 2012 and 2015 ventilation codes for nail salons

View  IMC code adoption by state

Win a Free Healthy Air™ Nail Salon Source Capture System from Aerovex Systems, Healthy Air™, and Nail Talk Radio

WIN From Aerovex Systems & Healthy Air Inc.® – A Nail Salon Source Capture System with Healthy Air® Technology!

The Healthy Air® Nails Source Capture System with patented eHepa® technology is designed specifically to remove nail chemical vapors & dust at the source, protecting both the technician’s and client’s breathing zone.

Head over the contest page to sign up.  You can enter once a day until the contest is over!

But HURRY, the contest ends September 6th!  Good luck!

Introducing the Salon Finder from Aerovex Systems

Introducing the Salon Finder from Aerovex Systems!

This powerful tool showcases your hair and nail salons across the US.

Current clean air customers can login and add their profile to maximize your exposure, giving your company a brief overview of your salon information and air quality rating.

salon finder map photo
This is a great way to get the word out to prospective clients in your area showing them that you have taken the appropriate measures to keep your salon air safe from dusts and chemical fumes and vapors.

Check out the Salon Finder today and create your salon profile!

Capture And Remove Airborne Microorganisms in Addition to Salon Vapors & Dust

While vapors & dust are the primary air pollutants nail salons are always most concerned with, airborne microorganism capture and removal should also be considered when implementing highly effective salon ventilation control measures.

The recently updated Nail Manufacturers Council on Safety’s updated “Guidelines For Controlling And Minimizing Inhalation Exposure To Nail Products” brochure refers to nail source capture systems with eHepa® technology as providing enhanced dust collection and vapor adsorption capability.

healthy air lineup

Aerovex Systems distributes both Healthy Air® salon air purification & source capture systems which couple advanced eHEPA® technology with proven Enhanced Carbon Catalytic Filtration to treat contaminated air in a multi-stage process that captures and removes harmful molecular air pollutants and microscopic airborne particles, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs), other hazardous gases and particulate, bacteria, virus, mold, fungi and odors.


Integrating a high energy field with traditional HEPA filtration, eHEPA® technology successfully overcomes limitations and inefficiencies associated with standard filters. The result is a truly effective air purification process that collects particles of the smallest size, including microorganisms, with high efficiency and at low pressure drop.

Healthy Air Compact Chemical Source Capture System


Furthermore, by applying a high energy field that generates active species that permeate through the filter media, eHEPA® not only captures but also destroys microorganisms at extremely high kill rates, thereby preventing the reproduction of these unwanted microbes on the filter surface which leads to re-contamination of the airflow.

To learn more on how to protect your health in the nail salon environment visit NMC Guidelines to  Minimizing Inhalation Exposure to Nail Products 

 

ehepa vs hepa graphic

know the diff

 

 

 

San Mateo County Healthy Nail Recognition Salon Program in The News

Recently there has been a flood of information in the news media about the health risks associated with working in nail salons.  Many salons simply don’t have the proper equipment in place to keep their workers safe from occupational hazards related to the inhalation of nail salon chemical fumes and dusts.   But there is light at the end of the tunnel…

Some local authorities have started programs that help educate and facilitate nail salons in their area to get the proper training and equipment to properly ventilate their salons, keeping their workers safe from over exposure of nail salon chemicals.

One such example in San Mateo County, California has implemented their Healthy Nail Salon Recognition Program for salons in the San Francisco bay area to certify healthy nail salons and even offer rebates on source capture ventilation equipment for those who participate in the program.

Doug Schoon Responds to Times Exposé on Nail Salons

Doug Schoon Responds to New York Times Exposé on Nail Salons:

“Unfortunately, this reporter distorted some important facts and didn’t properly quote me. I’m one of the world’s leading scientific experts on nails, nail salon products and services and have been a very vocal nail salon safety advocate for more than 25 years. I’ve written several books, hundreds of articles and videos on this subject and have traveled the world for many of those years providing nail salon safety focused presentations to nail technicians. So why would this reporter disregard most of what I told her? In my opinion, she had preconceived notions that she wanted to prove and that’s not fair reporting.

I asked her to help the nail industry with some important issue that needed to be addressed and I listed them and even offered some solutions. I urged her to use her upcoming NY Times article to show how these problems could be easily solved by getting industry, activists and government working together on the same page, which is the root of the issue. I promised that the nail industry would come to the table and asked her to help urge the activists to join with us to improve education and provide more safety information and training to nail technicians. The Nail Manufacturers Council on Safety (NMC) has been doing this for almost 20 years and last year offered to work with OSHA and the activist groups. As crazy as this sound the activists groups have refused and they continue stand in the way of progress. Fear-based activist groups don’t like to discuss facts and solutions, that’s the last thing they want when they’re trying to frighten people with misinformation.

I very much appreciated the first part of this 2-part article and thought it was extremely well written, but I’m disappointed in the second article. It entirely misses the big issues, by a very wide margin. I’ve studied nail industry issues for two decades and in my expert opinion, the best way to improve safety in salons is to increase nail technician education, provided fact-based information and to enforce the existing OSHA regulations The NY Times article fails because it misses these important points.

The article focuses on problems that are largely caused by misuse of the products, e.g. not following directions, not taking steps to avoid skin contact and not working in a well-ventilated area. These are the fundamental, basic requirements for working safely in a nail salon. Those that ignore their responsibility and do not follow directions and/or work in a unsafely manner may develop skin and respiratory irritations, which are early warning signs that the products are not being used or handled in a responsible fashion. I’ve personally talked and written about this for decades and this is a big part of my bi-weekly Internet video series, which focuses almost entirely on safety information for nail technicians. Information on how to work safely is readily available to nail professionals. If salon owners are discouraging safe working habits and conditions as the article claims, that sounds like an OSHA issue that should be addressed and I’d be happy to help in that effort. In my opinion, collaboration between OSHA and the NMC would surely bring about needed understandings and likely positive change, so I continue to hope this will happen someday and it is my hope that OSHA will consider working with the NMC’s group of world-class experts.

There is some important misinformation I wanted to point out. This reporter ignored my warnings that she had been deceived by fear-based activists groups concerning the California Department of Toxic Substance Control (DTSC) report t she is describing in her article. This wasn’t a safety issue at all! The chemicals she’s talking about were found in tiny trace amounts, hundreds or thousands of a percent. What did the DTSC say about these trace levels? They even said that the levels were “safe and this is not a safety issue”. The DTSC was ONLY concerned that the product labels said “xyz-free”, when they actually had a tiny trace, e.g. 0.0001%. The DTSC said that if you are going to say “free”, you should have be 0.0%, which I can understand their position. The reporter knew this was not a safety issue and that this issue occurred only with a few small brands of nail polish, but she still suggested that these manufacturers were producing unsafe products- which is clearly incorrect!

In addition, I’m pretty disappointed that she distorted my only quote. I didn’t say or suggest that no one is ever harmed by nail products. If you read what I said, you’ll see that’s not the case. Here’s what I actually said. The reporter claimed that nail polish was dangerous. I asked her how nail polish could be dangerous, if people aren’t being injured after more than 60 years of use. I told her that I personally didn’t know anyone who had been injured by nail polish and asked if any of her friends had been. I told her that I’ve not seen an epidemic of nail polish related injuries being admitted to hospitals or reported by doctors. All I have seen is deceptive claims and insinuations that claim nail polish is so-called “linked” to illnesses that have nothing to do with nail polish, e.g. lupus. I pointed out that since no one is being harmed and there doesn’t seem to be any evidence that anyone is being harmed by “nail polish”; doesn’t this suggest there is no evidence of harm from nail polish? Of course, any reasonable person can see this is true. Where are all the injured, if nail polish is so harmful? It’s been used since the 30’s!
Notice the reporter only partially quotes me and then she swiftly changes the topic in the next sentence and introduces OSHA’s comments. OSHA is clearly talking about “artificial nail coating” type ingredients, not “nail polish”. Two completely different topics. This makes it appear like OSHA was disagreeing with me and they aren’t. Tricky, right! It is a bunch of baloney and not a fair representation of my opinions and the reporter knows this. So, I call foul! I suspect that if OSHA were asked if they were worried that people are being harmed by nail polish, they would agree with me that there doesn’t seem to be any evidence of harm from nail polish in the general public.

Here are the facts. The skin and inhalation-related problems would not occurred if, A). Skin contact was avoided, B). Hands were washed regularly, C). Proper and appropriate ventilation is used, D). Label instructions followed/warnings heeded. It’s not hard to work safely in a salon, if you choose to and you’re taught how. That’s the key. I’d like to work with anyone who is interested in teaching this information, but ultimately it’s up to nail technicians to care about safety. In my experience, too many don’t. I believe those who refuse to work safely or to use basic common sense, should not be performing these types of services. These are professional services that should be provided by trained professionals who work safely.

How can these salon issues be addressed unless everyone works together? I’ve asked the Healthy Nail Salon Collaborative (HNSC) many times over the years to work with the Nail Manufacturers Council on Safety, yet they refuse. Why? I’ve found that this group doesn’t want to address the real issues; instead they want to demonize the products.

The reason that I took the time to speak to this reporter is because I wanted her to truly understand the nail industry’s issues, hoping she could help. Instead, like many reporters before her, she’s been overly influenced by fear-based activists who use junk-science and misinformation to fool the scientifically naive reporters and well-meaning politicians. Of course, I do plan on speaking to her about my disappointment and explain how I believed she erred. I’m a patient optimist, so perhaps in the long run this article will eventually boomerang into something good for the industry and maybe this will convince more nail technicians of the importance of understanding the products and working safely.”

http://schoonscientific.com/resources-publications.html

How to Improve Indoor Air Quality for Salons

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S–oNVNk7BA

Guidelines For Controlling And Minimizing Inhalation Exposure To Nail Products / English

http://schoonscientific.com/downloads/nmc-pubs/Guidelines-on-Inhalation-Exposure_ENG.pdf

Vietnamese

http://schoonscientific.com/downloads/nmc-pubs/Guidelines-on-Inhalation-Exposure_VIET.pdf

Korean

http://schoonscientific.com/downloads/nmc-pubs/Guidelines-on-Inhalation-Exposure_KOR.pdf

Spanish

http://schoonscientific.com/downloads/nmc-pubs/Guidelines-on-Inhalation-Exposure_SPAN.pdf

Italian

http://schoonscientific.com/downloads/nmc-pubs/Guidelines-on-Inhalation-Exposure_ITALIAN.pdf