Other Zones of Contention

The recent Nails Magazine article, “Dust Up Over Nail Salon Air Quality”, mentions proposed bill, A.526 (see link below).

This bill does not include proper ventilation engineering controls to prevent inhalation exposure to nail product vapors, and also does not specifically address nail dust inhalation exposure, which may be cause for even greater concern. Use of safer products should be a component of a broader approach to preventing nail technician overexposure to nail products. Relying only on chemical product banning simply delays introducing proper breathing zone protection with highly effective source capture ventilation technology.

Making matters worse instead of better, chemical banning proposals are also a tool & smokescreen for fear based advocacy groups interested in raising money, but not in practical solutions such as proper employee training & proper ventilation.

Use of a nail professional source capture system, combined with proper use and maintenance, is the key component in protecting the nail tech and client’s breathing zone from inhalation exposure to both nail product vapors and dust.

Other Zones of Contention

 

…….Kim penned an editorial published Sept. 1, 2016 in the Queens Tribune that stated, “Being decisive and taking action is important, but we need an inclusive, collaborative approach to truly help these workers.” In the editorial, Kim’s proposed solution to salon air quality is A.526, which would ban the use of the “toxic trio” of chemicals (which the bill identifies as “toluene, dibutyl phthalates, and formaldehyde”) in nail polish and hardeners. He states this will “more equitably address the real root of the issue.” However, as addressed in other NAILS magazine articles, the notion of any nail product ingredients being “toxic” at the levels used is controversial in and of itself. The IMC does not provide any relief based on products or processes used, and Aerovex’s Cardarella notes, “It’s a misconception to tie odor level to the hazard level of the chemical. Odor is not an indicator of the hazard….[Banning specific chemicals in nail salons] is not an answer by itself. It’s a misconception to think this approach eliminates the need for proper and appropriate ventilation.”

To learn more about proposed NY State Assembly bill A.526 click here

Read Nails Magazine article “”Dust Up Over Nail Salon Air Quality