Why Choose Aerovex?

For over 25 years Aerovex Systems has been dedicated to making the air you breathe better.  As a founding member of the Professional Keratin Smoothing Council, Aerovex Systems has been a leader in promoting proper ventilation in both hair and nail salon environments, focusing on proper keratin hair smoothing ventilation and source capture ventilation for nail salon dust and odor.

Most recently Aerovex Systems has teamed up with Healthy Air, Inc. in developing state of the art source capture systems for both keratin treatments and nail salon applications.

So why choose Aerovex?  The answer is simple…

Doug Schoon Presents the Top Ten Myths Related to Artificial Nails

Myths.  They are all around us.  Whether it be urban legend or something that is related to our everyday life, it is important to dispel fiction from facts.  This is especially important when it comes to things that you deal with everyday life and affect you directly, like your profession.

Doug Schoon, scientist and internationally known expert on the nail salon industry has laid out 10 popular myths related to artificial nails that will help modern nail technicians separate fact from fiction.  Highlighted in this post is myth number 9 on Mr. Schoon’s list, “You should wear a mask when you do nails”.

Click Here To Read Doug's Article

When proper measures are taken, such as using a source capture ventilation system in your salon, nail dust masks are not necessary.  By using these systems you capture the dust and vapor at the source of the problem, not allowing them to migrate into the salon air.  Masks might work well for stopping dust, but have no effect on stopping harmful vapors from entering your body.  Source capture systems take in this harmful vapor where the work is being done and capture them in a thick bed of activated carbon.

Check out this myth and others here as stated by Mr. Schoon here.

 

 

Doug Schoon Explains How Source Capture Ventilation Allows a Safe Working Salon Environment

 

 “Source capture ventilation” (SCV) is designed to capture salon chemical vapors and dusts at or near its source, protecting the technicians’ or stylists’ “Breathing Zone”,  (which is an invisible two foot sphere in front of you and your client’s mouth from which we draw every breath). SCV also prevents dispersing of contaminants into the salon air.

When properly maintained and the carbon filters are changed regularly, SCV systems are a great way to help ensure salon air quality remains safe and everyone is breathing comfortably during working hours. Both dusts and vapors must be properly controlled. SVC systems do both, which is why I fully support their use in salons.

Nail techs who overexpose themselves to strong odors for long periods can develop a condition called “olfactory fatigue”, which means your nose/brain gets tired of smelling the strong odor, so the brain begins to ignore it. Then you can’t smell odors that others can smell easily. Eventually, this can begin to adversely affect your sense of taste, as well.”

“In the US, it is a legal requirement that salons must have proper ventilation because workers must be provided with a safe working environment. The necessary engineering controls to make this happen are required. Utilizing additional ventilation is always a good choice.”

The 2012 International Mechanical Building Code (IMC), states: Nail stations in nail salons must be provided with a source capture system capable of exhausting not less than 50 cubic-feet-per-minute.

“Use of ceiling fans, opening windows and air conditioning, although they do circulate air and will reduce concentrations of salon chemical vapors, mists and dust, are not proper salon ventilation control measures.”

Use of appropriate ventilation is necessary in the salon to control vapors and minimize the potential for “sensory irritation” and adverse health reactions. Salons that are not equipped with the appropriate ventilation needed to prevent sensory irritation should NOT provide these services until the situation is corrected. Proper ventilation that is appropriate for the services being performed is VERY important for both the client and salon professional. The best way to prevent clients’ and stylists’ overexposure to formaldehyde vapors is to use local source capture ventilation. As stated by the Professional Keratin Smoothing Council, www.pksc.org, in its, Oct. 2011 press release:

Aerovex Systems, one of our founding members, is the developer of a hair salon source capture ventilation system, which provides a premiere example of “appropriate” salon ventilation equipment. Such equipment is useful for many types of salon services, including keratin hair smoothing, and can offer an extra layer of protection to help ensure the safety of clients and cosmetologists”.

 

The Professional Beauty Association (PBA) Releases New Educational Webinar Featuring Industry Expert Doug Schoon Explaining the Best Ways to Keep Your Salon Safe

The Professional Beauty Association (PBA) has released a new webinar entitled “Navigate OSHA Standards with Industry Expert Doug Schoon“.  The presentation, delivered by renown scientist and industry expert Doug Schoon, highlights the importance of taking the proper steps to ensure a safe salon environment.  Subjects covered in the video include:

Proper salon ventilation (such as implementing a source capture system)

Who and what is OSHA?

Compliance requirements for salons

Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs)

Formaldehyde, bloodborne pathogens and hazard communications

Top OSHA issues and violations within the salon

Doug Schoon, a leading research scientist and educator, will shed light on how these topics relate to salons and the professional beauty industry in terms we can all understand.  The importance of proper salon ventilation can be seen twice in the presentation at minute marks 27:10-28-15 and 53:18-55:10   To check out the the video (number 22 in the PBA catalog), click here.

Research Begins On The Effectiveness Of Source Capture Ventilation Systems For Use In Nail Salons

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) currently has a research project to examine the effectiveness of different source capture ventilation systems (SCVS) units for use in nail salons, including downdraft vented nail tables and portable SCVS received from developers, manufacturers, distributors, or vendors (see the Federal Register NoticeRight-click here to download pictures. To help protect your privacy, Outlook prevented automatic download of this picture from the Internet. External Web Site Icon). Summarized results of the research and recommendations from NIOSH will be shared with salon workers, salon owners, and the public with the hope of providing valuable information for maximizing salon ventilation effectiveness.