Other Zones of Contention

The recent Nails Magazine article, “Dust Up Over Nail Salon Air Quality”, mentions proposed bill, A.526 (see link below).

This bill does not include proper ventilation engineering controls to prevent inhalation exposure to nail product vapors, and also does not specifically address nail dust inhalation exposure, which may be cause for even greater concern. Use of safer products should be a component of a broader approach to preventing nail technician overexposure to nail products. Relying only on chemical product banning simply delays introducing proper breathing zone protection with highly effective source capture ventilation technology.

Making matters worse instead of better, chemical banning proposals are also a tool & smokescreen for fear based advocacy groups interested in raising money, but not in practical solutions such as proper employee training & proper ventilation.

Use of a nail professional source capture system, combined with proper use and maintenance, is the key component in protecting the nail tech and client’s breathing zone from inhalation exposure to both nail product vapors and dust.

Other Zones of Contention

 

…….Kim penned an editorial published Sept. 1, 2016 in the Queens Tribune that stated, “Being decisive and taking action is important, but we need an inclusive, collaborative approach to truly help these workers.” In the editorial, Kim’s proposed solution to salon air quality is A.526, which would ban the use of the “toxic trio” of chemicals (which the bill identifies as “toluene, dibutyl phthalates, and formaldehyde”) in nail polish and hardeners. He states this will “more equitably address the real root of the issue.” However, as addressed in other NAILS magazine articles, the notion of any nail product ingredients being “toxic” at the levels used is controversial in and of itself. The IMC does not provide any relief based on products or processes used, and Aerovex’s Cardarella notes, “It’s a misconception to tie odor level to the hazard level of the chemical. Odor is not an indicator of the hazard….[Banning specific chemicals in nail salons] is not an answer by itself. It’s a misconception to think this approach eliminates the need for proper and appropriate ventilation.”

To learn more about proposed NY State Assembly bill A.526 click here

Read Nails Magazine article “”Dust Up Over Nail Salon Air Quality

US Federal Law Requires Proper Nail Salon Ventilation

Scientist and salon industry expert Doug Schoon On Nail Salon Odors:

And, the fact many in the nail industry, think it’s inevitable that a nail salon will smell, well, like a stereotypical nail salon.

“In my opinion, it is inevitable that this incorrect attitude will change.  Salon and school owners will be eventually compelled to install appropriate ventilation in beauty schools and salons.   Unfortunately, that’s not the present case and OSHA is not enforcing the existing regulations.   Too many salon owners are ignoring their responsibility to provide proper safety training and appropriate ventilation- even though this is a decades old requirement under federal regulation.   Also unfortunately, it seems that either regulatory or legal action is the only thing that is going to change this, largely due to a poor attitude about odor and ventilation.   Sooner or later, a student or nail tech is going to realize that their school didn’t properly inform them about safety education, MSDS, etc. and/or their salon owner failed to follow the federal requirements under the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard and they are going to bring legal action against their school and/or salon.   A few schools will likely need to be heavily fined, and then school owners will begin to take this responsibility more seriously than many do now.   Salons owners may take a bit longer for them to obey the federal regulations, but that will happen too.   If you’re a school or salon owner reading this and you’re not sure what I’m talking about let me tell you… you should be very concerned!   Check out my free webinar (below) that I did for the Professional Beauty Association on this very topic and take the appropriate action to ensure your school/salon is in compliance with these important safety regulations.” 

To hear Doug Schoon talk about proper nail salon ventilation,  please skip to the 27:00 minute mark in the video.

 

 

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Proper and appropriate ventilation is a requirement no matter which types of products you are using, including UV gels. Ventilation is NOT just to control odors, it is for control of even odorless vapors and dusts. Even pleasant smelling things can create inhalation risks, so don’t make the mistaking of thinking ventilation is only for odor control.”

“In the US, it is a legal requirement that salons must have proper ventilation because workers must be provided with a safe working environment. The necessary engineer controls to make this happen are required, of which utilizing ventilation is always a good choice.”

The 2012 International Mechanical Building Code (IMC), states: Nail stations in nail salons must be provided with a source capture system like the one pictured above capable of exhausting not less than 50 cubic-feet-per-minute.

 

 

Protect Yourself By Preventing Dust Inhalation In Your Salon

Dust.  It’s everywhere.  Nowhere is this more evident than in your nail salon.  The best way to control dust in a salon is with a professional source capture ventilation system designed to collect and remove dust particles from the air or to ventilate them to the outdoors.  With these systems in place, dust is collected at the source and removed from the salon air before it can spread throughout the building, pollute the air, and end up in the last place you want it, your lungs.

In addition to source capture ventilation technology in your salon, wearing a high quality, properly fitted dust mask greatly reduces exposure to nail dust inhalation.  Choosing  a mask specifically designed for dusts, mists and molds is very important.  These types of masks are vastly superior to the flimsy and ineffective surgical type masks that some nail techs use today.  Dust masks rated “N-95” are highly effective and a great choice for dusts.

Check out the video below to see what salon industry expert Doug Schoon has to say about keeping your salon dust levels to a safe level.

Dangers of Electric Filing the Natural Nail